The Royal Grand Palace

The Royal Palace

Construction of the Royal Palace began in 1782 and was completed in time for the coronation of Rama I. The original living quarters were temporary and made of wood and thatch and the walls surrounding the palace were made of wood palisades. After the coronation the King moved into a mansion built of permanent materials. The only other building of permanent material at the time was Wat Phra Si Rattanasatsadaram (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) and the forts along the walls.

The plan of this new Royal Palace follow that of the Ayutthaya period. Only the central building seen today was missing until constructed as the Chakri Maha Prasat during the reign of King Rama V. The area of the original palace was about 51 acres. King Rama II expanded the area to todays size of about 60 acres.

The Royal Palace contains a number of halls, residences, and other buildings constructed by King Rama I. Later monarchs altered some and renovated others while still others were enlarged or torn down to make way for newer buildings.

All the buildings are not listed here but the most important ones are. The buildings are listed in groups according to their location inside the palace walls. A trip to Bangkok would not be complete without visiting the Royal Grand Palace.

The Phra Maha Monthain Group

This group of buildings is located in the central part of the Grand Palace toward the eastern side. It was the first group of buildings constructed by King Rama I and his own residence. He also used it for his coronation and has been used for coronations of all monarchs of the Chakri dynasty.

The Phra Maha Prasat Group

Two building in this group were constructed during the reign of King Rama I.

The Phra Thinang Chakri Maha Prasat Group

This group was built by King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) and in the beginning consisted of 11 buildings but only three remain today.

The Borophiman Mansion and Siwalai Garden Group

When King Rama II had the palace precincts expanded he ordered three golden halls and many European and Chinese style building to be constructed. Later King Rama III had these buildings pulled down to make room for temples to be constructed dedicated to his late father. King Mongkut (Rama III) ordered a residence also be constructed and stayed there until the end of his life.

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This document was updated on:  December 21, 2016